Specter + Tumblr

Minutiae from the makers of Specter, a magazine of literature and art.

The fact that some—regardless of ethnicity—look and scoff at black geeks’ bookish airs, that just adds to the coolness of it all. Because a true geek doesn’t care. And there is the essence of geek power. It says: I love something, and I’m going to tell the world I love it, and if you dismiss me for that, it just shows that my love is greater than your scorn. In fact, the more you hate what I love, the more you deride it, the cooler I become. My love is so strong that your disdain means nothing to me. The more you scoff, the stronger I get. I know who I am. I know the beauty I see, and nothing in the world can stop me from singing out that truth with my life. Nothing you can do about it. I like it and I’m not supposed to. I like it, in part, because I’m not supposed to. I have reached coolness by walking in the other direction so far that I went around the world and hit it from the other side.

Mat Johnson from his essay “The Geek” in the collection Black Cool, edited by Rebecca Walker.

The fact that some—regardless of ethnicity—look and scoff at black geeks’ bookish airs, that just adds to the coolness of it all. Because a true geek doesn’t care. And there is the essence of geek power. It says: I love something, and I’m going to tell the world I love it, and if you dismiss me for that, it just shows that my love is greater than your scorn. In fact, the more you hate what I love, the more you deride it, the cooler I become. My love is so strong that your disdain means nothing to me. The more you scoff, the stronger I get. I know who I am. I know the beauty I see, and nothing in the world can stop me from singing out that truth with my life. Nothing you can do about it. I like it and I’m not supposed to. I like it, in part, because I’m not supposed to. I have reached coolness by walking in the other direction so far that I went around the world and hit it from the other side.

Mat Johnson from his essay “The Geek” in the collection Black Cool, edited by Rebecca Walker.