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Minutiae from the makers of Specter, a magazine of literature and art.

Social media editor needed for Specter Magazine

Specter, an online magazine of literature and art, is now accepting applications for a Social Media Editor. A senior editorial position, the Social Media Editor will be responsible for expanding Specter’s online reach and readership, evangelizing the Specter “brand”, and managing Specter’s social media presence via Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr.

This is an unpaid position (Specter is an all-volunteer publication). The candidate must be able to meet the following requirements:

Specter Fan: hence, “evangelizing” the brand, whether you’ve read Specter since 2011 or recently found us online.

Social Media Fan/Expert: Demonstrated experience with Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr is required.

Loves Data: Experience with Google Analytics (site visits, unique visitors, engagement) and can interpret data to create action plans to expand readership and reach.

Strategist: How can each platform be best used for Specter? How do other literary organizations use social media? And in what ways can Specter use social media more effectively to improve readership and engage relevant conversations?

Plugged in: The ideal candidate is familiar with the indie/online literary scene as writer, editor, and/or reader. Candidate will look for advertising/cross-promotional opportunities for Specter.

Empire State of Mind: Though Specter is an online publication, we consider ourselves “Brooklyn-based”(because it’s where our editor in chief resides). So it’s not required to live in Brooklyn or NYC in general, but…it’ll definitely be a plus if you do.

Loves Video Chat: Must be able to attend our very infrequent staff meetings via Skype or Google Hangouts.

evelynnalfred:

mocada-museum:

Early Octavia Butler stories coming out in June
(ASSOCIATED PRESS) A pair of recently discovered early stories by prize-winning science fiction author Octavia Butler will be coming out as an e-book in June.
Open Road Integrated Media, a digital publisher, announced Tuesday that “A Necessary Being” and “Childfinder” will be compiled in a single volume titled “Unexpected Stories” and will be released June 24. Walter Mosley, the best-selling crime writer, has contributed an introduction.
“’Unexpected Stories’ reveals the themes that would become Butler’s lexicon: the complicating mysteries we assign to power, race, and gender,” Mosley writes. “Reading these tales is like looking at a photograph of a child who you only knew as an adult. In her eyes you can see the woman that you came to know much later; a face, not yet fully formed, that contains the promise of something that is now a part of you; the welcomed surprise of recognition in innocent eyes.”
Butler, who died in 2006 at age 58, was one of the first black science fiction writers to receive mainstream attention and was known for such books as “Bloodchild and Other Stories” and the novel “Parable of the Sower.” She was inducted, posthumously, into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2010.
Butler’s literary agent, Merrilee Heifetz, found the stories, written in the early 1970s, among the author’s papers at the Huntington Library in San Marino, Calif. According to Open Road, “A Necessary Being” tells of how the leaders of two ancient tribes “must broker a delicate peace to ensure that their peoples are to survive.” In “Childfinder,” a young woman “locates children with budding psionic powers and teaches them to protect themselves from society.”

Happiness

evelynnalfred:

mocada-museum:

Early Octavia Butler stories coming out in June

(ASSOCIATED PRESS) A pair of recently discovered early stories by prize-winning science fiction author Octavia Butler will be coming out as an e-book in June.

Open Road Integrated Media, a digital publisher, announced Tuesday that “A Necessary Being” and “Childfinder” will be compiled in a single volume titled “Unexpected Stories” and will be released June 24. Walter Mosley, the best-selling crime writer, has contributed an introduction.

“’Unexpected Stories’ reveals the themes that would become Butler’s lexicon: the complicating mysteries we assign to power, race, and gender,” Mosley writes. “Reading these tales is like looking at a photograph of a child who you only knew as an adult. In her eyes you can see the woman that you came to know much later; a face, not yet fully formed, that contains the promise of something that is now a part of you; the welcomed surprise of recognition in innocent eyes.”

Butler, who died in 2006 at age 58, was one of the first black science fiction writers to receive mainstream attention and was known for such books as “Bloodchild and Other Stories” and the novel “Parable of the Sower.” She was inducted, posthumously, into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2010.

Butler’s literary agent, Merrilee Heifetz, found the stories, written in the early 1970s, among the author’s papers at the Huntington Library in San Marino, Calif. According to Open Road, “A Necessary Being” tells of how the leaders of two ancient tribes “must broker a delicate peace to ensure that their peoples are to survive.” In “Childfinder,” a young woman “locates children with budding psionic powers and teaches them to protect themselves from society.”

Happiness

Anonymous asked:
What attracted you to this field? What inspired you?

thomasmensah:

There was no one moment or source of inspiration. My parents—college-educated—didn’t instill in me a love of reading at an early age. I didn’t gravitate to books, and though I wrote one or two stories as a child, I never thought of “writer” as a thing I might want to do.

All of that is to say, the attraction to literature—editing and writing—has been a slow burn, of sorts. In my teens, I started writing terrible poetry, which became terrible short fiction. I read a book—“Things Fall Apart”—because I actually wanted to for a change…then I read another book, then another, and so on…

As for inspiration? These days, I want to write like Bolaño and Baldwin and Butler and Smith (Zadie). I want to publish a literary magazine of the same quality as Granta. I don’t want my work to be boring, a great fear of mine. I’m inspired by the writers doing their thing online, writing like their lives are coming to an end, dodging boredom with every syllable.

Anonymous asked:
How do you make sure people hear about the magazine? How do you champion the work in the mag, versus how you champion your own work as a writer?

thomasmensah:

I think there’s room for improvement in how we at Specter Magazine promote the magazine. Our reach via social media—specifically Twitter, Tumblr, and Facebook—has enabled us to showcase each writer in each issue. But we could do more. One avenue I’m considering is more cross-promotion between Specter and other literary magazines. Another possibility is, of course, a print issue, and getting into local stores, especially here in NYC.

And to be completely honest, I suck as a “champion” of my own work; I’m much more comfortable championing the work of others. 

“ I have known the joy and pain of friendship. I have served and been served. I have made some good enemies for which I am not a bit sorry. I have loved unselfishly and I have fondled hatred with the red-hot tongs of Hell. That’s living. ”

Zora Neale Hurston

I hate that she had to die somewhat secluded as is the often curse of the genius. (Alice Walker bought her headstone post-mortem.) But for a lot of her life, she FUCKING LIVED. Didn’t simply exist and get by. Way ahead of her time. To me she is what Toni Morrison would call a dangerously free Black woman. And I will always be grateful to Alice Walker for bringing her work to the public in a way that without it, it could’ve been lost.

(via gradientlair)

(via shepherdsnotsheep)

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